Tag Archives: continuum

A warp in the TimeSpace continuum!

Einstein also theorized that really big objects, like planets, warp the TimeSpace continuum around them. The example often used to illustrate this idea is a bowling ball on a trampoline. The bowling ball is so heavy that it makes a big downward bulge in the surface. Then you roll a marble around the edge of the trampoline. The marble feels a pull toward the bowling ball as it circles around the trampoline. A huge object like the Sun is so enormous that it bends TimeSpace around it. Like the marble, planets are pulled toward the Sun as they circle around. Don’t worry—the planets don’t go crashing into the Sun! Why not? Because they’re set in their orbits around it. There’s a balance between the Sun’s gravity (pulling Earth closer) and the Earth’s centrifugal energy (pulling Earth away) as she orbits. This situation has existed for billions of years.
https://nineplanets.org/questions/getting-closer-sun/

Here’s an animation of the solar system traveling through space: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBlAGGzup48

Here are some cartoons.

http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~pogge/Ast162/Unit5/gps.html

http://www.alternativephysics.org/book/GPSmythology.htm
This one’s a guy drawing on a white board in time-lapse video which I kind of like—https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awMw0Vv0QBA

Back to the beginning of The Western Civ User’s Guide to Time & Space

It’s time for Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity!

It seems Time and Space aren’t two separate things after all. They’re 2 parts of one thing: TimeSpace. They’re what’s called a continuum.
(kon-TIN-you-uhm)
1 : a coherent whole characterized as a collection, sequence, or progression of values or elements varying by minute degrees
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/continuum

The Sweet-Salty continuum

I suppose a piano keyboard could be considered a continuum: lowest note on one end and highest note on the other, with the keys in between playing both low and high. You could draw up a continuum of food—from, say, the sweetest food you ever ate to the saltiest food you ever ate. Where is barbecue—both sweet and salty—on your continuum?

The continuum of TimeSpace has extreme ends, too—one end nothing but time and the other end nothing but space. This is really hard to think about. Time passes on one end but nothing physical is there. There’s physical stuff on the other end but nothing moves because it’s outside the medium of time. We live in the middle. We’re physical beings in a physical world who walk around and grow older and have kids and live our lives while plants sprout, bloom and die and the planets and stars whirl around in space.

(Does any of this remind you of Sunday-school? I mean how the Bible starts: “In the beginning…” and then God creates the universe, the Earth and the heavens, separates day from night. It’s how the Bible explains time and space. Which means God exists outside the TimeSpace continuum, which is too much for my brain to handle.)

Back to the beginning of The Western Civ User’s Guide to Time & Space

It’s about cyclical time

I told you the story of Persephone so you’d remember one thing: for the ancient Greeks, time was a cycle. The seasons followed each other over and over again. The Greeks didn’t think of time as a progression of numbered years, as we do. They named the years after whomever was the archon (ruler or king) at the time. Later on the Greeks numbered years by a 4-year cycle, called an olympiad. The Olympic games were held every fourth year, then the cycle started over.

The Greeks weren’t the only ones who think of time as a cycle.

Disney’s African tale The Lion King opens with the song The Circle of Life and its theme is cyclical time.

People who follow Indian and Asian religions—Hindus, Sikhs and Buddhists—think of time as a cycle. The problem of ‘which came first, the chicken or the egg?’ is a puzzler to us because we think in linear time. How can you have an egg without a chicken first? Or a chicken without an egg first? It’s not puzzling to someone who thinks of time as a cycle. Imagine a chicken and an egg riding a merry-go-round. The chicken follows the egg, which follows the chicken, which follows the egg, and so on and so on. It’s a continuous loop.