Tag Archives: homeschooling

Atomic Clocks

We’re now at the point where we can talk about…atomic clocks, which lose only one second every 100. Million. Years. Yay!

What is an atomic clock and how does it work? That’s an excellent question. Honestly, I have no idea. You would think, as an adult grown-up-type guy, I’d know something like that. I don’t. I avoided science classes in school so I could hang out in the art room.

I don’t know how you get atoms to float around in a tube so you can zap ‘em with radio waves until they change into a different energy state and bounce off a detector that counts the atoms in their new changed state and funnels the whole mess into a feedback loop…

I need to go away for a few days and marinade myself in sciency research until I figure this one out. I’ll be back. In the meantime, please enjoy this hold music—

Back to the beginning of The Western Civ User’s Guide to Time & Space

Just a second

Before I got side-tracked into digital clocks and watches, we were talking about satellites and the Global Positioning System. I mentioned that the satellites that send us navigational signals need to have an incredibly accurate clock aboard. Even a second’s difference in time between satellites’ clocks would change significantly your GPS data—and give you the wrong location.

So you’re thinking, “Well, Manders, those quartz crystal clocks lose or gain only 15 seconds a month. That seems pretty accurate to me. How you gonna improve on a system that measures 32,768 oscillations per second? How you gonna do that? How?”

To which I reply, with a rueful smile, “My friend, there is another clock yet to come, whose sandals the quartz crystal clock isn’t fit to lace. I speak of a clock that loses only one second every 100 million years!”

Really.

Back to the beginning of The Western Civ User’s Guide to Time & Space