Tag Archives: school visit

A fantastic day at Cranberry Elementary

Many thanks to my hosts at Cranberry Elementary School! I hope everybody had as much fun as I did. I read The Perfect Nest since they are currently hatching some duck eggs. I painted a couple of pictures—a duck riding a unicorn and a pickle driving a tractor*—and got some great questions from the students. I even got to see my next-door neighbor!

 

*an International Harvester, though we made the steering wheel John Deere green

The Manders School Visit World Tour

For the past week or so I had the great honor to give presentations to the students at Rowan Elementary School (who put a pirate ship in the middle of their library!) and Bedford Elementary School (whose walls are adorned with giant artworks created by the graduating classes through the years). Many thanks to my hosts/hostesses for inviting me and sharing my work with the kids. I was treated like a rock star and I’m grateful.

I’m gassing up the garishly-decorated double-decker tour bus to be at Cranberry Elementary School later this month. If you’d like me to visit your school, contact bookings@johnmanders.com

Author/illustrator school visit tips from your old Uncle John

I got an e-mail from an author/illustrator colleague who is about to do her first school visit—she asked for some tips about how to make it a success. Here are a few ideas that came to mind.

First of all, don’t be nervous. The students are going to treat you like a rock star. You’ll be new and different and fun. They’ll love you.

Dress like you’re going on an interview.

Have you read the story aloud yet? Rehearse before you go in front of the students. Read it to a friend or two this weekend, just so you can get comfortable with doing that. BE AN ACTOR—be sure every character sounds different from the others. Don’t be afraid to go over the top with the voices. I’m a ham, and wear some kind of hat that fits with the story—a cowboy hat, or bunny ears—because the narrator is also a character. Relax, don’t rush through your reading, and enjoy the experience.

Ask for water. Ask for a microphone if you’re speaking to an assembly. If it’s just 25 or so kids, no mic.

Know how much time you’re allotted and keep an eye on the clock.

I have a few of my books in jpeg format. The school should have a computer and projector—ask for it ahead of time, along with a tech person. You bring your jpeg file on a flash drive. Bring at least one backup on a different flash drive. You can project your images while you read the story.

If you feel comfortable doing it, draw the kids a picture afterward. An easel with a big pad and a chisel-point marker is all you need. Keep it simple. Draw something you’re good at drawing—a cat or a dog. Describe what you’re drawing as you draw it as if you were doing a presentation on the radio.

If you do Q&A, keep the answers simple. Preface your answers with things like, “That’s a really good question.”

When the show’s over, thank everyone and turn the class back over to the teacher.

Cherry Valley-Springfield School

I had a wonderful time meeting the students and teachers at Cherry Valley-Springfield last month—thanks for inviting me! Those guys had some crazy ideas for the painting demonstration. Here is something you don’t see every day: an alien pirate bunny riding a dragon/dinosaur while eating a cheeseburger. With a cat and a spider.

img_20170104_094156876_hdr

A fun week at Eden Hall Upper Elementary School

Thank you for inviting me!

IMAG0592 IMAG0594 IMAG0593-1

Some great ink!

Thank you, Claire Kirsch, for your fine reportage on my recent visit to Penns Manor Elementary and my collaboration with the students to create the horrible & dreadful Baby Pandasaurus Rex! Read all about it here.

Image

Thanks, Penns Manor Elementary!

IMAG0579

More grants for early reading programs

As I mentioned yesterday, Target offers grant money to schools and organizations who need help with an early reading program. An early reading program might entail hiring a children’s book author/illustrator to present to students (he said rather shamelessly).

Dollar General also has a grant program for early literacy/youth development—as does Barbara Bush, Verizon, Scripps-Howard, and Clorox.

Here is a round-up of foundations who offer grant money for summer reading programs. Here are awards & grants available from the International Reading Association.

If you would like a detailed description of my presentations to help you apply for these grants, be sure to give me a yell!

Target offers grants for reading programs!

If you’re a school librarian looking to hire an author or illustrator to present to your students (hint, hint) Target is accepting applications for Early Childhood Reading Grants.

I’m busily putting together a world tour. I’ll be barnstorming across New York State and Pennsylvania—maybe winding up in Connecticut—September/October 2014.

I’ll be in the Pittsburgh area for Read Across America Week, March 2 – 6, 2015.

If I’m booked for 2 or more consecutive days in the same area, I’ll give those schools a discount on my speaking fee. If you’re interested e-mail Lisa at Bookings@johnmanders.com.

Make your reservations now!

I am booking school visits in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area for Read Across America Week, March 2 – 6, 2015. Friday the 6th just got reserved this morning. If I can book the whole week, everybody gets me for 25% off the regular rate.

Contact Lisa— bookings@johnmanders.com